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Physical Exams - For Work, School, Travel, etc.

 


If you need a comprehensive yet affordable physical exam for school, work, camp, travel, the army, or for a simply a general health checkup, you're at the right place.

 

We take our physical exams seriously. The human body is an intuitive and sophisticated machine that, at times, needs evaluation and adjustment to maintain excellent health. Because of our strong focus on prevention and wellness, we use every physical exam as an opportunity to analyze your health history and test your major organ systems in an educated fashion.

Screening patients at regular intervals help to detect disease before the presence of symptoms and create good doctor patient relationship. Most health plans understand the importance of a "physical" and will offer it to its members at different intervals. However, if a medical plan offers an annual physical, one should take advantage of it.

Our Comprehensive Exams are extensive but are individualized according to age, gender and specific needs.

Thorough review of medical history and current health status with board certified physician. It starts with a lot of questions regarding past medical history, family history, immunization status, allergies, current medications, lifestyle habits, nutritional status and level of physical activity.

For patients who want a deeper dive into their health status, we can also combine your physical exam with more comprehensive blood testing to help you achieve your health goals. Many people come to our clinic to get a physical exam in addition to blood tests as an opportunity to check areas such as their lipids and cholesterol levels, kidney function, or thyroid status.

All of our doctors are board certified Doctors licensed by the Medical Board of California.

 



 

4 Reasons to Get Regular Physicals

Prevent health problems. This is the most important reason. In the West, it seems medicine is geared towards treating health problems and not preventing them. While it’s true that doctors spend most their time treating people who are already ill, more and more doctors are focusing on preventing their patients’ health problems before they start. A regular physical exam is one tool to accomplish this goal.

By getting a regular exam, you can nip your health problems in the bud. If your doctor spots a funky looking mole, it can be removed before you have problems with skin cancer. If he notices that your blood pressure is too high, he can suggest a diet and fitness plan to help reduce it before you have a heart attack.

Also, when you get your physical, your doctor will ask you about your family’s health history. If your family has a history of certain diseases or health problems, your doctor can give you guidance on how you can reduce your risk of suffering those ailments.

Save money. While we sometimes avoid the doctor because we don’t want to pay for an appointment, if a doctor can nip a problem in the bud before it gets serious, you’ll save a lot of money on medical bills down the road.

Establish baselines. If you haven’t been to the doctor in a while, getting a physical will establish baselines for things like your weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Having these baselines will help your doctor gauge your health’s subsequent progression or regression.

Develop a relationship with your doctor. Because men don’t see the doctor regularly, we often don’t have a doctor with whom we’ve developed a trusting relationship. But having a doctor that you can trust can ensure that you get the best care possible. First, we’re more likely to open up to doctors that we have a good relationship with, which means the doctor will get the information he needs to make a correct diagnosis when things are wrong. Second, having a regular doctor means you’ll have someone who knows your health history well enough that they don’t have to re-invent the wheel every time they see you. Finally, when you have a doctor you feel comfortable with, you’ll be less hesitant to go see him when something about your health goes south.

 


 


Our flat rate office visit fee is just: $80 After $20 Discount

Get $20 OFF With Mention of Our Website
 

Call 1-877-54-MYDOC (1-877-546-9362)
to schedule your consultation NOW!

We will answer any questions you may have either over the phone or email at opencaremc@gmail.com.


 




To schedule an appointment call 1-877-54-MYDOC (546-9362) or book online here:

 

 

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AGE 18 - 39

* You should have two physical exams in your 20s. During the first exam, ask to have your cholesterol checked. Your height and weight should be checked at every exam. Other blood tests are not indicated in healthy young people.
* Have your blood pressure checked every year. Watch for blood pressure screenings in your area. Ask your health care provider if you can stop in to have your blood pressure checked. Check your blood pressure using the automated machines at local grocery stores and pharmacies. If the systolic number (top number) is greater than 130 or the diastolic number (bottom number) is greater than 85, call your doctor.
* Visit a dentist every year for an exam and cleaning.
* If you have vision problems , have an eye exam every 2 years.
* Men should perform a monthly testicular self-exam. If you are not sure what you should be looking for, contact your health care provider for instruction.
* Women should perform a monthly breast self-exam. If you are not sure what you should be looking for, contact your health care provider for instruction.
* Women should have a yearly pelvic exam and Pap smear done to check for cervical cancer and other disorders. If your Pap smears are negative for 3 years in a row, your doctor may decrease the frequency of Pap smears to every 2 - 3 years.
* After age 19, you should have a tetanus-diphtheria and accellular pertussis (TdAP) vaccine as one of your tetanus-diphtheria vaccines one time. You should have a tetanus-diphtheria booster every 10 years.

AGE 40 - 65

* Have a physical exam every 1 years. With each exam, you should have your height and weight checked. Other routine diagnostic tests are not recommended.
* Men should have a yearly rectal exam to check for colorectal cancer and prostate cancer after the age of 50. You should also have a stool guaiac test done every year and flexible sigmoidoscopy every 3 - 5 years. Patients at high risk for colon cancer (those with long-standing ulcerative colitis, prior colorectal cancer, prior large colorectal adenomas and strong family histories of colon cancer) should be screened periodically with colonoscopy .
* If your cholesterol level is normal, have it rechecked every 5 years.
* Have your blood pressure checked every year.
* Go to the dentist every year for an exam and cleaning.
* If you have vision problems, continue to have an eye exam every 2 years. Everyone (those with and without eye problems) should begin to have regular eye exams every 2 years after the age of 40. Once you turn 45, make sure that you also have tonometry done to check for glaucoma .
* Women should perform a monthly breast self-exam. If you are not sure what you should be looking for, contact your health care provider for instruction.
* Women should have a yearly pelvic exam and Pap smear done to check for cervical cancer and other disorders. If your Pap smears are negative for 3 years in a row, have your Pap smear done every 2 - 3 years.
* Women over the age of 40 should have a mammogram done every year to check for breast cancer . Early mammograms may be recommended for women at high risk for breast cancer.
* You should have a tetanus-diphtheria booster vaccination every 10 years.
* You should receive a flu vaccine every year after the age of 50.

AGE 65 AND OLDER

* Have a yearly physical exam. With each exam, you should have your height and weight checked. Routine diagnostic tests are not recommended unless your doctor finds an abnormality in your history or physical exam.
* Have a yearly rectal exam to check for colorectal cancer and prostate cancer. You should also have a stool guaiac test done every year.
* Have your blood pressure checked every year.
* Have your hearing tested every year.
* If your cholesterol level is normal, have it rechecked every 3 - 5 years.
* Have an eye exam every 2 years. Make sure your health care provider checks for glaucoma.
* Go to the dentist every year.
* Every 3 - 5 years have a sigmoidoscopy exam or every 10 years have a colonoscopy. During this test, your health care provider will insert a telescope-like tube into a portion of your colon to check for cancer.
* Women should perform a monthly breast self-exam. If you are not sure what you should be looking for, contact your health care provider for instruction.
* Women should continue to have a yearly pelvic exam and Pap smear done to check for cervical cancer and other disorders. If your Pap smears are negative for 3 years in a row, have your Pap smear done every 1 - 3 years.
* Women should have a mammogram done every year to check for breast cancer.
* Get the following vaccinations :
o After age 65, get a pneumonia vaccine (pneumococcal vaccine - polyvalent).
o A flu shot (influenza vaccine) every year.
o Get a tetanus -diphtheria booster ( TD vaccine ) every 10 years